General Information

Program

Tentative Program

November 11 (Wed) : Keynote lectures, Technical sessions, Panel discussion

November 12 (Thu) : Keynote and Chin-Fu Tsang Award lectures, Technical sessions

November 13 (Fri) : Plenary Sessions of Emerging Scientist, Keynote lectures, Technical and Special sessions

 

 

Short Courses

November 9(Mon) – 10(Tue), 2020

The short course registration fee is for Ordinary/Student: $200/$85

 

Introduction to Reactive Transport Modeling with CrunchFlow/CrunchClay (Cancelled)

Instructors: Carl Steefel and Christophe Tournassat, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Description:  This two day course will present an introduction to reactive transport modeling using the CrunchFlow/CrunchClay software. CrunchFlow, a recent R&D 100 award winner, is a software package for multicomponent reactive flow and transport that has been developed over 30 years. CrunchClay is a more recently developed branch of the code that includes electrostatic effects on ion transport in clay-rich media. The course will feature a variety of example problems made available to participants, with topics including ion transport through clay, CO2 sequestration, contaminant transport, chemical weathering and isotopic fractionation.
The short course will use a pre-built executable for a Windows PC operating system, or one built for MAC OS. In addition, the CrunchFlow software is now Open Source, so participants will receive the source code that they can compile themselves on a Mac or Linux platform.

 

Reservoir Geomechanics

Instructor

Maurice Dusseault (U. of Waterloo)Profile
Maurice B Dusseault is a professor of Geological Engineering in the Earth and Environmental Sciences Department, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. He spent three years as a roughneck and drilling mud technician prior to completing his BSc (1971) and PhD (1977). From 1977 to 1982, he occupied a Research Professor Chair at the University of Alberta funded by the Alberta Oil Sands Technology and Research Authority. During this period, he developed novel skills and broad experience in new production technologies and drilling rock mechanics.
Maurice carries out research in subsurface geomechanics (drilling, hydraulic fracturing, reservoir geomechanics, sequestration, geothermal, energy storage, waste disposal…), and is the recognized world expert in areas such as new production methods, deep waste sequestration in sedimentary basins, and reservoir geomechanics. He has co-authored two textbooks and over 600 professional articles in conferences and journals, and works with industry and government agencies as an advisor and instructor.
Dr Dusseault was a SPE Distinguished Lecturer in the year 2002-2003, visiting 19 different countries and speaking about new oil production technologies to 28 separate SPE Sections. He has presented his short courses in 20 different countries over the years, with a reputation for clear presentations based on simple but useful material.
CONTACT INFORMATION
Maurice B Dusseault, PhD, PEng, Professor of Geological Engineering
University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave West, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, CANADA
T: +1 519 888 4590; F: +1 519 746 4751 H: +1 519 746 5280; Cell: +1 519 589 9994; Email: mauriced@uwaterloo.ca

 

Title: Reservoir Geomechanics Abstract

Preamble:  Traditionally, rock mechanics applications in oil and gas extraction bring substantial financial rewards.  Non-conventionally, rock mechanics applications to geothermal energy exploitation, CO2 sequestration, waste fluid injection, compressed air energy storage, lithium-rich fluid extraction, solution mining of soluble salts, and chemical leach mining of metallic ores can also bring financial rewards.  In some cases, these activities massively reduce environmental impacts, and even help reduce climate change impacts.  The course Reservoir Geomechanics shows engineers and geoscientists involved in reservoir development how to optimize completions, stimulations and production operations through better understanding of rock mechanics.  Rock mechanics aspects of project monitoring and waste management (zero discharge policy) are also addressed.  The course will provide you with a deeper understanding of the application of Geomechanics principles and methods to reservoir management so that better decisions can be made in actual field circumstances.  Most important, the participant will learn how to establish a design protocol for Geomechanics applications to reservoirs, leading to more successful natural resource exploitation, waste storage, and energy extraction, while reducing risk.  Optimization and risk reduction are profitable activities; optimization increases profits; risk mitigation reduces losses.  A proactive approach to reservoir geomechanics means identifying problems before they occur, collecting the important baseline information before conditions change, and planning and executing appropriate actions to manage risks.  
Many specific topics are explicitly addressed, including issues such as why casing shear takes place and how to reduce its incidence, the effects of reservoir subsidence and how to predict it, fractured reservoir permeability changes during drawdown or injection, interactions between waste injection and induced seismicity, and so on.

 

WHO SHOULD TAKE THE COURSE

The course is intended for engineers, geoscientists, and technologists involved in reservoir and rock mass engineering, rock mass stimulation, monitoring, project waste management, and enhanced oil recovery planning and execution.  Managers and supervisors will also benefit from the general overview of various technologies, presented in the context of rock mechanics.  You do not have to have an engineering degree to benefit from this course, as the material will be presented in terms of physical principles, and few calculations are needed.  Of course, knowledge of subsurface engineering, an area led by the oil and gas industry, combined with a good sense of mechanics and physics are valuable assets for anyone taking this course.  You will develop a stronger understanding of issues such as compaction, hydraulic fracturing, the effects of depletion, casing shear, chemical impacts on rock behavior, and so on.  New ideas are presented, and the broad overview will bring value to all participants, not just oil and gas engineers.  

 

TOPICS COVERED

This list covers the topics addressed, although the order of the presentations will be different.  The full 5-day course has about 30 separate PowerPoint presentations, all of which will be provided to the participants, along with additional material. For the 2-day CouFrac 2020 course, Maurice will provide 7 hours of live lectures (3.5 each on Nov 9 and 10), and 7 hours of prerecorded lectures, along with all his other material.  

 

INTRODUCTION AND REVIEW OF PETROLEUM GEOMECHANICS

Review of Rock Mechanics Principles:  The effective stress concept and the role of pore pressure.  Stress-strain behavior, bulk modulus, compressibility.  Strength and yield of reservoir rocks.  Behavior of intact and jointed rock masses.  

Review of Earth Stresses:  Stresses in the earth in various types of basins.  Determining initial stress conditions in typical reservoir cases.  The use of hydraulic fracturing methods to estimate stresses.

Principles of Stress Equilibrium:  Stress redistribution in and around reservoirs during exploitation.  The important aspect of volume change in reservoir rocks subjected to changes in pressure, temperature, or stress.  Linking these volumetric changes with stress changes in the reservoir.

Mechanical Behavior of Reservoir Rocks:  Testing and stress-strain-yield properties of reservoir rocks, poorly consolidated sandstones, North Sea Chalks, porous coal, diatomite, and other materials.  Deformation properties of reservoir rocks.  Yield of reservoir rocks through shearing, tensile rupture, pore structure collapse.  The concept of shear dilation and changes in permeability and mechanical properties.  The use of the Mohr-Coulomb yield criterion for strength analysis.

Transport Properties of Reservoir Rocks:  Thermal conductivity and expansion properties of rocks and minerals.  Effect of high temperatures on clay minerals and hydrous minerals.  Permeability vs. effective stresses in porous media, fractured media.  

 

COMPLETION GEOMECHANICS

Mechanical Formation Damage While Drilling:  Conditions for mechanical yield around the borehole and the consequences on rock properties.  Alteration of the flow properties of joints and fractures under conditions of different effective stresses.

Mechanics of Cementation:  Why most cement jobs have a tendency towards leakage, even though the quality of the cement job was impeccable.  Cement shrinkage and the effect on stresses.  Cementation and hydraulic fracturing in susceptible strata.

Hydraulic Fracturing:  The behavior of hydraulic fractures in differential stress fields.  Breakdown, propagation, and fracture closure pressures related to stresses in the earth and mechanical behavior.  Fracture orientation and tendency to rise.  Hydraulic effects and hydrodynamic forces placed on the reservoir rock.  Alterations in fracture direction in reservoirs.  Proppants and placement efficiency.  Strategies for fracturing from vertical and horizontal wells, effects of tortuosity. 

 

CONVENTIONAL PRODUCTION GEOMECHANICS

Well Testing and Rock Mechanics:  Why the conventional well test equations are incomplete solutions.  Incorporating the reaction effect of the overburden on well test analysis.  Non-linear compressibility effects.  Effects of mechanical damage around the wellbore, and introduction of a new solution accounting for rock damage.  

Reservoir Stress Changes Because of Injection and Production:  A simple model for stress changes because of changes in fluid pressures.  How to estimate stress changes.  The concept of a coupled fluid flow and stress solution. Why the stress path of the reservoir is important to future drilling, including depletion behavior.

Reservoir Compaction and Production:  Delayed compaction in reservoirs because of scale effect of drawdown zone versus reservoir thickness or threshold pressures to trigger compaction by cohesion destruction or overcoming the stress history which led to geological overcompaction of the reservoir.  Pressure maintenance to reduce or eliminate compaction.

Surface Subsidence and Casing Shearing above Compacting Reservoirs:  Mechanics of compaction transmission to the surface.  Modeling approaches for stresses and strains.  Shearing of overburden rock layers and the loss of wellbore because of casing collapse.  

 

ENHANCED RECOVERY GEOMECHANICS

Temperature Changes and Reservoir Stresses:  How to calculate the lateral stress changes arising because of the injection of hot or cold fluids.  

Thermal Pressure-Driven Recovery Processes for Heavy Oils:  Steam line drive, cyclic steam injection.  The effect of stress changes on steam fracturing.  Why steam fractures over-ride the reservoir.  Break-through of steam and hot fluids to overlying strata.  Why the concept of “fill-up” in cyclic steaming is actually evidence of stress changes.  

Casing Shearing and Thermal Processes;  Stress changes and stress concentrations in the reservoir during large-scale thermal processes. 

Gravity Drainage Processes:  Although not a dominantly geomechanics issue, gravity drainage methods are so vital for the future that they are reviewed in detail.  Steam-assisted gravity drainage.  Inert gas injection.  Vapor assisted petroleum extraction.  Advective instabilities in pressure-driven processes.

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration and EOR:  The geomechanics issues related to CO2 use and sequestration.  CO2 properties and GeoRisks arising from them.  Rock – CO2 interactions, potential changes of lateral stress from shale-CO2 shrinkage or the dissolution of carbonate minerals. 

Shale Gas and Reservoir Development: Origins and nature of Shale Gas.  Rock properties and production mechanisms.  Resource development through massive staged hydraulic fracturing, and the impact of stress fields in situ.

Pressure Pulsing for Liquid Flow Rate Enhancement and Workovers:  Development and implementation of a new method to change fluid flow behavior based on coupled Darcy flow and dynamic excitation.  

 

PETROLEUM INDUSTRY ENVIRONMENTAL GEOMECHANICS

Induced Seismicity: Changes in T, p leading to microearthquakes.  Potential for casing shear, seal breaching.  

Geomechanics Aspects of Liquid Waste Disposal:  Stress changes associated with large-scale water injection.  Is there a seismic risk?  Thermal effects of cool waste water injection and induced fracturing.  Co-produced water reinjection.

Slurry Fracture Injection (SFI) of Solid Wastes, Cuttings:  The use of depleted reservoirs or oil-free permeable strata to dispose of granular waste materials.  Dealing with regulatory agencies.  Monitoring and analyzing the process.  Disposal of tank bottoms and oily slops using SFI.  Achieving zero-discharge operations. 

Gas Storage Geomechanics:  Issues in the use of old reservoirs or caverns dissolved in salt for the storage of natural gas.  Stresses and their changes during cyclic pressurization.  Reservoir screening and management.  Design and storage of natural gas in salt caverns.

 

MONITORING RESERVOIR PROCESSES

Conventional Approaches to Process Monitoring in Reservoir Engineering:  Pressure, rate, and temperature measurements using monitoring well data and flow meter data.  Geophysical logging 

Deformation Monitoring:  The deformation field above a reservoir.  How to model surface deformations.  Measurement techniques and precision.  Tilt measurements and surface level survey approaches.  The use of deformation measurements to give volume changes in the reservoir, and the use of these in process management.  The potential for surface or borehole gravimeters to assess deformations and density changes.

Microseismic Monitoring:  Use of the emitted microseismic field to understand and track processes in reservoir engineering.  Mechanisms of MS emission from stress, temperature, and pressure effects.  Front tracking.  Monitoring natural gas storage reservoirs and how to increase the differential storage pressure for natural gas by analyzing the MS emissions over time.

Resistivity Monitoring:  Changes in reservoir rock resistivity as the fluids and the temperatures are altered.  Requirements for electrical monitoring.  The placement of electrodes in the reservoir using an insulated well (fiberglass casing or joints).

 

The short course will be given in a hybrid way of real time and recorded lectures.

Please, see the brochure for details of real time live lectures

 

Description:  Traditionally, rock mechanics applications in oil and gas extraction bring substantial financial rewards. Non-conventionally, rock mechanics applications to geothermal energy exploitation, CO2 sequestration, waste fluid injection, compressed air energy storage, lithium-rich fluid extraction, solution mining of soluble salts, and chemical leach mining of metallic ores can also bring financial rewards. In some cases, these activities massively reduce environmental impacts, and even help reduce climate change impacts. The course Reservoir Geomechanics shows engineers and geoscientists involved in reservoir development how to optimize completions, stimulations and production operations through better understanding of rock mechanics. Rock mechanics aspects of project monitoring and waste management (zero discharge policy) are also addressed. The course will provide you with a deeper understanding of the application of Geomechanics principles and methods to reservoir management so that better decisions can be made in actual field circumstances. Most important, the participant will learn how to establish a design protocol for Geomechanics applications to reservoirs, leading to more successful natural resource exploitation, waste storage, and energy extraction, while reducing risk. Optimization and risk reduction are profitable activities; optimization increases profits; risk mitigation reduces losses. A proactive approach to reservoir geomechanics means identifying problems before they occur, collecting the important baseline information before conditions change, and planning and executing appropriate actions to manage risks. Many specific topics are explicitly addressed, including issues such as why casing shear takes place and how to reduce its incidence, the effects of reservoir subsidence and how to predict it, fractured reservoir permeability changes during drawdown or injection, interactions between waste injection and induced seismicity, and so on.

 

Reference

Venue & Transportation

Venue

Global Education Center for Engineers Convention(#38), Seoul National University
SNU

ADDRESS

Global Education Center for Engineers Convention(#38), Seoul National University, 1, Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, Korea

HOW TO GET

Domestic Participants Click Here ▶

Foreign Participants Click Here ▶

Please Visit the Website for More Information on Seoul National University Click Here ▶

 

 

Transportation

SNU

 
 
Accommodation
Please make an individual reservation.
A. Hoam Faculty House
SNU SNU

Address : SNU Hoam Faculty House 239-1 Nakseongdae-Dong, Gwanak-Gu, Seoul, Korea 151-057

Facility : Restaurants

Breakfast : KRW 13,600(Korean, Western Style, Japanese Food)

Tel : +82-2-8800-400• Website : http://www.hoam.ac.kr/eng/

 

Reservation : http://www.hoam.ac.kr/eng/rooms/reservation.php

 

Location

http://www.hoam.ac.kr/eng/hoamHotel/contact_us.php

SNU

 

 

 Way #1 From Incheon airport to Hoam  SNU 

  SNU

1. Take the "#6017 Airport limousine bus" at the GATE 27(Terminal 2) or GATE 6B(Terminal 1)
2. Get off at the last stop "Hoam Faculty House"

 

 Way #2 From Gimpo airport to Hoam 

1. Take the "#6003 Airport limousine bus" at the Bus terminal #6. The bus will depart every 20minutes. The bus fare is 4,000 won by cash.
2. Get off at the main gate of Seoul National University. Take a taxi or a shuttle from the main gate of Seoul National University.
     - Shuttle service is available upon reservation only.

     - Running hour of shuttle : 08:00~18:00 (Monday to Friday).

     - Please contact at 82-2-880-0311 for reservation

 

 Way #3 By Taxi 

1. Take a taxi from Incheon/Gimpo airport to Hoam Faculty House(HFH).

  Incheon Airpot → HFH Gimpo Airpot → HFH
Fare 75,000 won 30,000 won
- Everyday -

2. The fare could be changeable upon traffic situation. Please contact us at +82-2-880-0311 or front@hoam.ac.kr for reservation.

 
 
Invitation

Request for Invitation Letter

To obtain a visa to attend CouFrac 2020 Conference, many embassies will require a visa letter as part of the visa application process. In order to request a visa letter from the organizing committee, you MUST meet one of the following criteria:
 

Have a paper accepted for presentation at the conference. (Please visit paper submission system if you are not sure of the status of your paper.)
Have registered AND paid in full for the conference. (Proof of your conference registration is needed.)
PLEASE NOTE
 
Request for hard copy version of the letter will not be accommodated. 
Visa letter requests will take 3-5 days to process.
▬ In order to receive the Letter of Invitation from CouFrac 2020, you must be registered and paid in full for the conference.
▬ CouFrac 2020 can only issue the Letter of Invitation for the conference. No other kind of documentation will be provided for use of visa applications.
▬ It may take 3-5 days for processing.
To start the request process, please fill out the request form in its entirety, then click “Submit.” Your request will be reviewed and if approved, the visa letter will be sent to you via email attachment in PDF format.

First Name Last Name
Passport Number
Affiliation
Email
Your Address
Phone Number
Registration Number
Paper ID (if apply)
Paper Title (if apply)

Go to Top
Log-in
Close
Subscribe
Close